Saturday, May 27, 2017

On Science and Spirit

A thermodynamics professor had written a take home exam for his graduate students. It had one question: "Is Hell exothermic (gives off heat) or endothermic (absorbs heat)? Support your answer with a proof."
Most of the students wrote proofs of their beliefs using Boyle's Law (gas cools off when it expands and heats up when it is compressed) or some variant. One student, however, wrote the following:
First, we need to know how the mass of Hell is changing in time. So, we need to know the rate that souls are moving into Hell and the rate they are leaving.
I think that we can safely assume that once a soul gets to Hell, it will not leave. Therefore, no souls are leaving.
As for how many souls are entering Hell, let's look at the different religions that exist in the world today. Some of these religions state that if you are not a member of their religion, you will go to Hell. Since there are more than one of these religions and since people do not belong to more than one religion, we can project that all people and all souls go to Hell.
With birth and death rates as they are, we can expect the number of souls in Hell to increase exponentially.
Now, we can look at the rate of change of the volume in Hell because Boyle's Law states that in order for the temperature and pressure in Hell to stay the same, the volume of Hell has to expand as souls are added. This gives two possibilities:
#1 If Hell is expanding at a slower rate than the rate at which souls enter Hell, then the temperature and pressure in Hell will increase until all Hell breaks loose.
#2 Of course, if Hell is expanding at a rate faster than the increase of souls entering Hell, then the temperature and pressure will drop until Hell freezes over.
So, which is it? If we accept the postulate given to me by Ms. Therese Banyan during my Freshman year, "It will be a cold night in Hell before I sleep with you", and we take into account the fact that I still have not succeeded in having sexual relations with her, then #2 cannot be true, and so Hell is exothermic.
The student got the only "A" in the class.

Monday, March 13, 2017

21 Simple Tips



ONE Give people more than they expect and do it cheerfully.

TWO Marry somebody you love to talk to. As you get older, their conversational skills will be as important as any other.

THREE Don't believe all you hear, spend all you have or sleep all you want.

FOUR When you say, "I love you," mean it.

FIVE When you say, "I'm sorry," look the person in the eye.

SIX Be engaged at least six months before you get married.

SEVEN Believe in love at first sight.

EIGHT Never laugh at anyone's dreams. People who don't have dreams don't have much.

NINE Love deeply and passionately. You might get hurt but it's the only way to live life completely.

TEN In disagreements, fight fairly. Please No name calling.

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

My Summer Thrill


Old Florence Library

Most people look forward to this time of year. For some, it means new jobs, having to move, or that dreaded family vacation. For the majority of people, it is a time to relax, a time fotr recreation, time at the pool – for some, even a time for chaos. As a child, mine were a mixture of these – a mixture of a free-for-all attitude with the sense to accomplish something, nothing, and usually leading to do something crazy. Thrills were a necessity to keep my young life exciting. But one particular thrill, during one of my childhood summers, almost changed my life for good.

This summer started out like any other summer. School had let out and everybody was off to explore everything new and old, hoping for something new to do. However, after a few weeks, we were wishing school would start back up – we were bored. So like every other day, my friends and I set off for adventure. As we stopped by to pick up each of my friends, their mother would follow him to the door, telling him to be careful and stay out of trouble. It looked like we were marching off to war somewhere; and we were, our own little adventure. Several hours later, we had played long enough and decided to get something cold to drink. On the way to the store, we passed the town library and noticed that the older kids had left their normal hangout. It was then; we decided to try their fun, their thrill – riding the ropes.

Wednesday, October 12, 2016

Sand Animation | Kseniya Simonova



The story begins sometime before June 21,1941. Two people fell in love and were hoping to be together - forever. On June 21,1941, Adolf Hitler attacked the Soviet Union. The young man goes off to fight. The woman and their newborn son remained at home trying to survive the occupation - a time when many experienced lots of pain and suffering. In 1945, the WW2 is over and the son and mom are waiting for the father/husband to return home.

The whole story is a tribute to the people those who died or survived during the war. The loss and victory should never be forgotten.

It is not only an animation, but the music and songs compliment it to complete the story.

Thanks to T. for the interpretation.

Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Closing the Gap

Closing the Gap

In my last article about Driving in the Nation's Capital, I poked fun at the various things that we Washingtonians have come to love, hate, or just accept. After having the opportunity to drive in major cities worldwide, I have come to conclusion that our traffic problem is not due to congestion, road construction, or even the full moon. We are a victim of our own habits and “it’s all about me” attitude. The one maneuver that is responsible for the majority of the traffic problems is a maneuver I call “closing the gap.”

Growing up in the West, there were wide-open spaces and roads that go on forever. As a kid, we never thought about the hours spent in a car. You see, in the West, the roads go on forever and pretty much in a straight line. You could go faster, but the increase in speed didn’t really gain that much for you.  A moderate increase in speed gained you some time savings, but anything more than that increased risk and reduce fuel economy. Give this fact, most drivers were contempt to put on the cruise control and just enjoy the radio as they rolled out the miles.

Saturday, October 1, 2016

The General Store

Country Store

Growing up in a small town, we only had one store. Everybody stopped at this store, since the next larger store was ten miles away. It was a small store containing only the essential items, but our store was ours and it satisfied our needs.

Every day after delivering the local newspaper, my brother and I would set off for the general store. As we came up the sidewalk, the store owner’s dog would come up to greet us. And usually somebody was sitting on the porch, drinking a Red Cream Soda, and chewing on some licorice whips.

Before we would go in, we would chat with the fellow for the local gossip. Then we would peruse the bulletin board for the local news and read all of the for sale signs. It was a ritual that was done before finally going into the store.

Sunday, September 11, 2016

Tree on Fire

Union Cemetery Leesburg, Virginia

It was back to my favorite cemetery to take more photos. I took some great photos from the year before, so I was looking for something different. As I walked around the cemetery, I noticed this tree with red and orange leaves. It was the only tree in the cemetery with this color - very spooky. The photo was taken and processed as an HDR picture to bring out the vibrant colors. It truly looks like a tree on fire.

Established in 1855 on the immediate outskirts of Leesburg, Union Cemetery was created as a public cemetery open to people of all faiths. It predated three other "Union" cemeteries in Loudoun County established at Hillsboro, Waterford and Lovettsville. The cemetery contains the 1908 Union Chapel and several notable monuments, including a Confederate War Memorial at the north end of the site, and an imperfectly cut 30-foot- high granite column, allegedly designed for a D.C. public building, but rejected and brought to the cemetery in the 1890s.

This photo was taken on Halloween weekend with the Nikon D90 - an extraordinary camera.

Photo via www.flickr.com